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sketchinthoughts:

conceptcookie:

Citizen Video Tutorial - Intro to Character Design

Watch our new tutorial on an introduction to Character Design and Shape Language from newcomer artist, Melissa Van Der Paardt HERE

I did a tutorial for concept cookie! Feel free to check it out if you’re interested! :)

(via bonesmakenoise)

spookybenny:

captainharrie:

omnbvc:

I WANT A GOOD PENCIL BRUSH FOR PAINT TOOL SAI

SLAMS FIST ON TABLE

uhh, you can use mine if you’d like?

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You have to add smudges though if you really want it to look like a pencil

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also if you have photoshop, you can make it look a lil more like it’s been scanned in…

(via junosunderland)

I am a HUGE fan of your work; the style is so simple yet beautiful! I have yet to find my own style & want to try the way you do it. Do you think you could give me some pointers? Also, would an ultra fine tip work like a sharpie pen? Ty & ilysm!

hehlstorm2000

feelingfairyish:

Yes, those ultra fine tips are good! I love you too:)

The number one things I can suggest to learning artists:

1.) Try to make your drawing as loose as possible. It takes a lot of practice (I’m still working on it myself) but the best drawings have the most fluidity. Loosen up, relax your hands, don’t worry about proportions, and just scribble something out. Focus on movement, not measurements!

2.) Don’t be afraid to borrow traits from other artist’s styles, but do NOT steal their entire style. I know it’s tempting to use another artist’s style because it seems so perfect and you “wish you could draw just like them”. But trust me, you’ll be so much more satisfied and successful if you do your own thing. Again. this doesn’t mean you shouldn’t copy a few things, like the way they draw hands, or eyes, or whatever. But make sure to mix it with other styles, and inventing your own way of drawing things!

3.) Style comes naturally. Don’t force it to always be consistent. Sometimes I draw eyes as little dots, and sometimes they’re more like circles with expressive lines on top. Sometimes I even do complete eyes with lids, lashes, whites, and irises. And my style develops too - what i did 6 months ago looks nothing like what I do now. Look at Glen Keane’s work in the 80’s and 90’s compared to what he did on Tangled or Duet. Even the great professional artists aren’t done “growing”. 

So if you feel your style is changing, DO NOT say “oh, that isn’t my style, I can’t do that”. OF COURSE YOU SHOULD DO IT. Be adventurous. Overall, you will still have the same style in the way your lines move, but you will have developed.  

4.) Comparing yourself to other artists can be good for you (it pushes and motivates you, because artists are competitive as fuck) - but it could also ruin you.

There was a study in which a group of psychologists went to a 1st grade or kindergarten classroom and asked, “who here is an artist?” Most of the class raised their hands. Then they went to a middle school classroom. “Who here is an artist?” Every kid in the room pointed to one or two students.

These kids gave up art because they saw their classmates getting really good, and they decided they were bad at it. That’s bullshit. The only reason that their classmates had become good artists is because they kept drawing. 

Here’s the thing I always tell people, the most important thing to keep in mind, the number one mantra you should remember:

The only way to become an artist is to love it. You have to love it enough that, even though you don’t think you are good, you keep drawing. You can’t resist art. “Practice makes perfect”, and the only way to get enough practice is to DEVOTE yourself to artwork.

If this sounds like you, but you think you aren’t good at art: 

You will be, someday. We all start somewhere. 

abakkusdraws:

artanecdotally:

amazinglyartisticadvice:

shriekydonkey:

artists-help:

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Exercises

just a good lil’ reminder

Sadly relevant to my life right now.

Keep the magic hand healthy, folks. 

remember your stretches friends!!

abakkusdraws:

artanecdotally:

amazinglyartisticadvice:

shriekydonkey:

artists-help:

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Exercises

just a good lil’ reminder

Sadly relevant to my life right now.

Keep the magic hand healthy, folks. 

remember your stretches friends!!

(via jolly-ollie)

feelingfairyish:

anatomicalart:

Let me link Yall’ to this holy grail.
I present to you Character Design Reference
on [Pintrest] || [Tumblr] || [Twitter] || [Facebook] || [YouTube]

I couldn’t even include all of the reference boards this blog contains on this photoset. That’s right! There’s EVEN MORE! There are pages and pages of them! It is an inspiration treasure trove!
Bookmark this link!
Fill your life with inspiration!

reblogging so I can use this later. 

storyshots:

Drawing from films

Drawing from films is a ridiculously useful exercise. It’s not enough to watch films; it’s not enough to look at someone else’s drawings from films. If you want to be in story, there’s no excuse for not doing this.

The way this works: you draw tons of tiny little panels, tiny enough that you won’t be tempted to fuss about drawing details. You put on a movie - I recommend Raiders, E.T., or Jaws… but honestly if there’s some other movie you love enough to freeze frame the shit out of, do what works for you. It’s good to do this with a movie you already know by heart.

Hit play. Every time there’s a cut, you hit pause, draw the frame, and hit play til it cuts again. If there’s a pan or camera move, draw the first and last frames.

Note on movies: Spielberg is great for this because he’s both evocative and efficient. Michael Bay is good at what he does, but part of what he does is cut so often that you will be sorry you picked his movie to draw from. Haneke is magnificent at what he does, but cuts so little that you will wind up with three drawings of a chair. Peter Jackson… he’s great, but not efficient. If you love a Spielberg movie enough to spend a month with it, do yourself a favor and use Spielberg.

What to look for:

  • Foreground, middle ground, background: where is the character? What is the point of the shot? What is it showing? What’s being used as a framing device? How does that help tie this shot into the geography of the scene? Is the background flat, or a location that lends itself to depth?
  • Composition: How is the frame divided? What takes up most of the space? How are the angles and lines in the shot leading your eye?
  • Reusing setups, economy: Does the film keep coming back to the same shot? The way liveaction works, that means they set up the camera and filmed one long take from that angle. Sometimes this includes a camera move, recomposing one long take into what look like separate shots. If you pay attention, you can catch them.
  • Camera position, angle, height: Is the camera fixed at shoulder height? Eye height? Sitting on the floor? Angled up? Down? Is it shooting straight on towards a wall, or at an angle? Does it favor the floor or the ceiling?
  • Lenses: wide-angle lens or long lens? Basic rule of thumb: If the character is large in frame and you can still see plenty of their surroundings, the lens is wide and the character is very close to camera. If the character’s surroundings seem to dwarf them, the lens is long (zoomed in).
  • Lighting: Notice it, but don’t draw it. What in the scene is lit? How is this directing your eye? How many lights? Do they make sense in the scene, or do they just FEEL right?

This seems like a lot to keep in mind, and honestly, don’t worry about any of that. Draw 100 thumbnails at a time, pat yourself on the back, and you will start to notice these things as you go.


Don’t worry about the drawings, either. You can see from my drawings that these aren’t for show. They’re notes to yourself. They’re strictly for learning. 

Now get out there and do a set! Tweet me at @lawnrocket and I’ll give you extra backpats for actually following through on it. Just be aware - your friends will look at you super weird when you start going off about how that one shot in Raiders was a pickup - it HAD to be - because it doesn’t make sense except for to string these other two shots together…

ricelily:

All these pages are 8.5x11, 300 dpi. Feel free to print it out in full size if you like physical copies

Comics and Comic Artists

Jake Wyatt- deviantart tumblr

"Welcome To Summers"

"Soliloquy"

Suggested Reading/Books:

Scott McCloud’s “Making Comics” (entirely done in comic format)

Exercises/Practices/Tutorials:

Lettering

Speech Bubbles Mistakes

Paint Bucket Resource

Storyboarding and Camera angles

What is DPI?

Transferring Traditional to Digital (Photoshop Tutorial)

(via geminiagent)

how to draw sharp teeth and have them make sense: a tutorial

busket:

so you want to draw a character with sharp teeth? that’s cool! you have a lot of options. like most things, how you draw fearsome teeth can be improved by looking at nature and i’m gonna show you how.

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Read More

(via shantigo)

askstalkerloo:

needs-more-pony:

kennoarkkan:

shadyfolk:

amaipetisu:

A few tips everybody should consider. I’ve experienced all those and some more. I’m not good at english but I hope you get it. Go and support some artists out there and let them draw you nice shit. Not as nice as FairyNekoDesu but still will be cool so give them a chance and you’ll be surprised.

THIIIIS.

All of these things.

Especially the deadline. If you don’t have a deadline thats way in advanced it’s not gonna get done by then. I am almost always taking on a ton of projects at once and sometimes need a break from it to: work on stuff for me, work on stuff for friends, search for jobs, be the work slave of parents, actually relax and try to relief stress, technical difficulties, researching on how to do stuff, ect.

Sometimes it’s done in a day. Sometimes it’s done literally a year later. But I always update the people I work with so they know I haven’t forgotten.

Do NOT rush your commissioner. Let them work at their pace and it will be worth it. Rushing them insures a rush job which will very likely make the quality decline.

All this is true. Also, ref sheets are the most important thing ever. I can’t stress that enough. They make the job A LOT easier (instead of having to compare 10 different pics between each other and see that everything fits, you just look at 1!!)  If you plan in commissioning your character a lot, or even if its not yours (like from an anime or something) Either commission one or look for ref sheets of the show (because there are!).

Also i strongly suggest not using Instant Messaging. Information can be lost pretty easily there and it’s hard to come back to it. Use emails instead. The info stays there, and it’s easy to search for it. It’s also an excellent way to keep track of the descriptions, so if either the client or artist made a mistake, you can see the email threads and see who’s right straight away.

also pushy clients LOVE instant messaging. Pls no.

All of this ^

Oh god yes this.

(via gigglegabits)

aronjshay:

randeepk:

Thank you all so much. A special thanks to apay00 for just being there always, anne walkerfarrell, aronjshay and moonanimate for boosting the hell out of this signal. And of course scubed and joncrowley for surprising anne and I this morning with a crowd funding campaign.
Thank you all so much. You all rock.

You are very welcome, Randeep & Anne! :D
If any of you awesome people reading this aren’t familiar with what happened— Randeep and Anne were robbed by the people their apartment management company sent in to their apartment (early and WITHOUT permission or notification!) to paint and clean. The thieves took a bunch of their stuff— including his laptop and external hard-drive. 6 YEARS OF WORK & MEMORIES STOLEN! You can read about it here.
It’s horrible when bad things like this happen!
Yesterday everyone signal boosted the hell out of Randeep’s post in hopes that anyone would spread the word along, and keep an eye out! You never know who might see or know something and I want to thank everyone again for being so amazing and signal boosting!
To update— Some of Randeep’s friends have started a fundraiser to help out Randeep & Anne in their time of need! So rad! :D
I’m hoping that everyone can help signal boost the fundraiser that scubed and joncrowley started to help raise funds for Randeep and Anne :D 
Help Randeep and Anne build new memories!
Even if you can’t donate, you can help with your signal boost, and help these two folks out! Thank you everyone! :D

Help Randeep! :D he was robbed and they stole his laptop and all of his artwork! Keep your eyes open for him :-)

aronjshay:

randeepk:

Thank you all so much. A special thanks to apay00 for just being there always, anne walkerfarrell, aronjshay and moonanimate for boosting the hell out of this signal. And of course scubed and joncrowley for surprising anne and I this morning with a crowd funding campaign.
Thank you all so much. You all rock.

You are very welcome, Randeep & Anne! :D

If any of you awesome people reading this aren’t familiar with what happened— Randeep and Anne were robbed by the people their apartment management company sent in to their apartment (early and WITHOUT permission or notification!) to paint and clean. The thieves took a bunch of their stuff— including his laptop and external hard-drive. 6 YEARS OF WORK & MEMORIES STOLEN! You can read about it here.

It’s horrible when bad things like this happen!

Yesterday everyone signal boosted the hell out of Randeep’s post in hopes that anyone would spread the word along, and keep an eye out! You never know who might see or know something and I want to thank everyone again for being so amazing and signal boosting!

To update— Some of Randeep’s friends have started a fundraiser to help out Randeep & Anne in their time of need! So rad! :D

I’m hoping that everyone can help signal boost the fundraiser that scubed and joncrowley started to help raise funds for Randeep and Anne :D

Help Randeep and Anne build new memories!

Even if you can’t donate, you can help with your signal boost, and help these two folks out! Thank you everyone! :D

Help Randeep! :D he was robbed and they stole his laptop and all of his artwork! Keep your eyes open for him :-)

leseanthomas:

Here’s some of the most amazing and invaluable advice you’ll most-likely ever get from one of my good colleagues and legends in comics/gaming, creator JOE MADUREIRA. It’s what i’ve been preaching to you aspiring artists since i arrived on DA, but i think his POV says it perfectly:

*WARNING: SOME MATURE LANGUAGE*

"DO YOU REALLY WANT TO BE A SUCCESSFUL ARTIST? 


Or a successful WORKING PROFESSIONAL?



Believe it or not there is a difference. I’m not usually a soapbox type guy, I don’t like instructing people, and I think I’m a terrible teacher. But hey, it’s Friday and I’m in a strange mood. So here goes:

I’ve noticed that a good number of my fans happen to be aspiring artists themselves. This is for all you guys. I get asked constantly: "Where should I go to school?" "What classes should I take?" "What should I study for anatomy?" "What pencils and paper do you use?" "Should I be working digitally now instead of traditionally?" "How do I fix my poses? Learn composition? Perspective?" "When am I going to develop my own style?" "Who were your influences?" "Teach me how to draw hands!" The list goes on…


Here’s the deal. All of that stuff *is* important, and it may nudge you in the right direction. A lot of it you will discover for yourself. What works best for one person doesn’t work for another. That’s the beauty of art. It’s personal. It’s discovery. DON’T WORRY ABOUT ALL THAT CRAP!

Instead I’m going to answer the questions that you *SHOULD* be asking, but aren’t. These are things that have only recently occurred to me, after doing this for 20+ years. These things seem so obvious, but apparently they elude a lot of people, because I am surprised at how many ridiculously talented artists are 'failing' professionally. Or just unhappy. The beauty of what I’m about to tell you is that it doesn’t matter what field you’re in or what your art style is.

In no particular order:


1) DO WHAT YOU LOVE. If you are passionate about what you’re doing, it shows. If you’re having fun, it shows. If you’re bored, IT SHOWS. Some guys are able to work on stuff they have zero interest in, and still pull off great work, but I find that when I do this my motivation takes a huge hit. And Motivation is key. Money is not a great motivator. It’s temporary like everything else. And honestly, I’ve gotten paid the most money for some of the shittiest work I have ever done. That may sound awesome, but it’s not. And here’s why…

2) You MUST stay Excited and Motivated. Have you noticed that there are days you can’t draw a god damned thing? And some days you feel like you can draw anything? It’s 4am but you don’t notice because you are in the ZONE. Your hand is racing ahead of your mind and you can do no wrong?! Maybe it’s some new paper you got. Or a new program you’ve been wanting to try out. Or you just found some amazing shit on DeviantArt, or watched some movie that just makes you want to run straight to your board. This relates to the above because while it is possible to involve yourself in projects you aren’t excited about—maybe you need the cash, or think it will look good on your resume, whatever it is—it’s not going to last. You need to stay fresh. Expose yourself to new things. New techniques. You should be getting tired of your own shit on a fairly regular basis. Otherwise other people will.

3) Check your Ego. If you think you’re the shit, you’re already doomed. You may be really, really good at what you do, but there’s someone better. Sorry. There’s always plenty to learn, even for us old dogs. So when I meet young upstarts who have this sense of entitlement, or a know-it-all attitude, I just have to laugh. Some of the biggest egos I’ve ever witnessed were from people who have accomplished the least. Meanwhile, most guys who are supremely talented AND successful, and have EARNED the RIGHT to have an ego and throw their weight around, don’t. Why is that? It’s because…

4) RELATIONSHIPS ARE IMPORTANT. This may be one of the biggest lessons I’ve had to learn. Early on, I didn’t value my relationships with people. Creatively or otherwise. I felt like I didn’t need anyone’s help and I could figure everything out on my own. Let’s face it, many of us become artists because we are reclusive, social misfits. We’d rather stay inside and draw shit than go outside and play. We like to live inside our own minds. Why not?! It’s awesome in there! And sometimes we don’t want to let other people in. But like I said—you can’t do it alone. I can honestly say that as much as I try to stay current, as much as I try to push my work and draw kick ass shit that will excite people, I would not be where I am today if it weren’t for all the other people I’ve met and learned from along the way. Guys who pulled strings for me. Took risks on me. Believed I was the right guy for the job. You need to manage your relationships. You need to network, and meet people. Drawing comics is still a pretty good place for reclusive types—but if you want to work in big studios—Making games, Films, animation, basically any other type of job on the planet, you’d better start making some connections. Be likeable. Be professional. That doesn’t mean be an opportunistic ladder climber. Fake people lose in the end. Be yourself, but be professional. It’s no secret that when people are hiring, our first instinct is to bring in people we know. It’s human nature. I don’t like unknowns, even if their portfolio is awesome. If we have a mutual connection, if they have great things to say about you, you’re in. If you have AMAZING artwork to show, and I call your last employer and they tell me what a pain in the ass you are to work with, you’re done. Talent and skill only get you so far. I am literally amazed at how often I meet guys that are total assholes and think they are going to get anywhere.

5) Here’s the BIG ONE. The greatest obstacle you will ever have to overcome IS YOURSELF. And the Fear that you are creating in your own head. Stay positive. Stop defeating yourself. There are artists I know that are so damn good they make me pee my pants. I look up to these mofos. I study their shit and I want to draw like them. And they are almost NEVER working on their DREAM project. And—big surprise, they aren’t happy in their job. “Why NOT?! WTF is WRONG WITH YOU?!” is usually my reaction. And the answer is almost always "The market isn’t great right now" "Other stories/games/comics like mine don’t do very well" "The shit that’s hot right now is nothing like mine, It’s just going to fail." "I’m not sure I’m good enough." "I need the money." "Too Risky." "I tried it before and failed. " It doesn’t matter what words they use, they are afraid for one reason or another. I know. I’ve been there.

But here’s the deal. YOU NEED TO TAKE RISKS. Guess what? YOU ARE MOST LIKELY GOING TO FAIL. If you want it—REALLY want it, that won’t stop you. You will learn A LOT. My good friend Tim constantly jokes about how I jump out of planes without a parachute and worry about the landing on the way down. You may think that I’m lucky, that it’s easy for me to say because I’m already successful, that I’m in a different situation than you all are. But it’s not true. Risk is risk, no matter what level you’re at. If you’re already successful, you just take even bigger risks. But they never go away. Everything in life is Risk vs. Reward. Not just in your career. LIFE. You’d better get used to it.

I didn’t know what the hell I was doing when I got into comics. I left the #1 selling book at the time ( Uncanny X-men ) to work on Battle Chasers during a time when 'Conan' was about the only fantasy comic people knew. And no one was buying it. I wanted to work in games, so I started a game company. I had NO IDEA WTF I was doing. I just wanted it, really bad. We tanked. It failed. No big surprise. But the people I worked with got hired elsewhere and rehired me. I started ANOTHER game Company. We had 4 people and a dream, and some publishers wouldn’t even meet with us, because their ‘next gen console’ teams had 90+ people on them. I literally got hung up on. "Stick to handheld games, it’s smaller, maybe you can handle that…" one MAJOR publisher told us. I don’t blame them. But we didn’t let it stop us. Thank god we didn’t listen to them. Vigil was born. Darksiders happened, AND we got to make a sequel. It stands shoulder to shoulder with the best games in the industry, and the most elite and experienced game dev studios in the world. How is that possible?!!! Hardly any of us had even worked on a console game before. I’ll be honest, I was thinking we would fail the whole time. I just didn’t care. If I had to play the odds on this one, I’d bet against us.

Why am I telling you all this shit? This is not me patting myself on the back. It’s just stuff that has somehow only dawned on me recently when it’s been staring me in the face for so long. I feel like I need to wake you guys up!!! I’ve been limiting myself. I’ve gotten afraid. I’ve taken less risks. I saw my career going places I didn’t want to go. I wasn’t happy and I wasn’t excited. And I’ve realized, that all that stuff I just talked about is the reason I am where I am today. Not because I have a manga style, or I draw cool hands, or there’s energy in my drawings, or all the other things people rattle off to me. There are other guys that do all that same shit, and do it better. And amazingly, those same guys constantly tell me “Man, I wish I could do what you are doing.” “SO DO IT!!!!!” PLEASE listen to me—because I want you guys to make it. I want to look to one of you people for inspiration some day when it’s 2am and I need to keep drawing. Stop worrying about all the other stuff—the pencils, the paper, the anatomy, all that shit. It will only get you so far. You’ve already got most of what you need. I hope this helps some people. From the bottom of my heart, thank you for all the support over the years. You are all one of the greatest motivating forces in my life and my career. Sappy but true. Ok, let’s go draw some shit!!!”

(via thecandyjar)

Freelance 101: Build your Hourly

belindalovelee:

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Build your Hourly

Now that you’ve gotten your business plan/dreams down on paper, you’ve got to determine how much to charge. This is probably the hardest part determining how much your work is worth! I personally bill hourly and would suggest to price yourself that way too….

The Color Thesaurus

maria-amino:

tangy-san:

moirakatson:

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All from Ingrid’s Notes on Wordpress, direct link here.

thank the lord oh my

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(via deepspiration)

Hi! I'm a huge fan! may I ask... what brushes do you use? :)

mikayladraws

dailycatdrawings:

Hi there! I’ve answered this question before in previous posts here:

How I usually approach using digital brushes

One of my favorite brush settings to mess with

I know it’s kinda silly, but you really just have to play around and experiment. I hardly ever stick to one brush for very long. Hope that helps!